[tex flag] Heart of Texas World War I Bios Coleman County Texas  [usa flag]

Private William W. Allen

Mr. William Walter Allen, a single white male living in Trickham, Coleman County, Texas and working as a farm laborer for T. J. Baker, 4 miles west of Trickham, as of June 5, 1917. William was a short slender build man with black hair and grey eyes, and probably a very tan complexion from all of the farm work. Born near Crockett, Houston County, January 20, 1894 to Abner B. and Ella L. Allen, and was raised there in Houston County. William and his family are reported in the 1910 census as being in Trinity County. His father is listed next of kin on William's Army record, and living in Trinity, Texas.

William was drafted into federal service for the US Army on July 15, 1918 at Coleman, Texas. Recruit Allen was sent to boot camp at Camp MacArthur in Waco he was assigned to Company A 7th Infantry Training Battalion 57th Depot Brigade. On September 17, 1918 Private Allen was assigned to 27th Company Camp MacArthur September Auto Replacement Draft and they moved out to the port of embarkation in New Jersey and boarded the transport ship to France on September 26, 1918 for the 11 day voyage to France. William got sick during the winter with the influenza and died of pneumonia on January 12, 1919 in France. His father was notified in Trinity, Texas.

[Army] Private William W. Allen was buried in a temporary grave there in France to be later repatriated to America. The Graves Registration Service of the US Army was William's new unit. The GRS did an awesome job during and after the battles of WW1. William's remains were loaded onto the USAT St.Mihiel in Antwerp Belgium on December 4, 1921 and arrived in Hoboken New Jersey on December 16, 1921. Then shipped January 24, 1922 by train to Trinity, Texas arriving January 29, 1922. William Allen was laid to rest in the Taylor Cemetery at Trinity County, Texas. Survived by his father. His mother died in 1916 at Zephyr, Brown County, Texas.

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DOD 12 Jan 1919


Farrier William G. Brady

Mr. William Greenlea Brady, a married white male living in Burkett, Coleman County, Texas and working as a farmer for himself as of June 5, 1917. William was a short slender build man with light brown hair and blue eyes, and probably a very tan complexion from all of the farm work. Born in Robertson County, September 16, 1888 to Henry W. and Susie Brady, and was raised there in Robertson County. William and his family are found in the 1900 census as living in Robertson County. His father died in 1905. William was reported in the 1910 census as being in Coleman County, working as a servant. William married Mary Etta E. Burkett, date unknown, and they had two children. He listed them on his draft registration card as reasons for exemption. William's wife is listed next of kin on his Army record, and living in Burkett, Texas.

William was drafted into federal service for the US Army on March 30, 1918 at Coleman, Texas. Recruit Brady was sent to boot camp at Camp Travis in San Antonio he was assigned to 28th Company 7th Training Battalion 165th Depot Brigade. On April 11, 1918 Private Brady was assigned to the Veterinary Corps Remount Depot 329 at Ft Sam Houston. William was promoted to a Farrier on January 1, 1919. William got sick with the influenza and died of pneumonia on January 4, 1919 in the base hospital at Ft Sam Houston, Texas. His wife was notified in Burkett, Texas.

[Army] Farrier William G. Brady's remains were shipped by train to Coleman, Texas arriving January 6, 1919. William Brady was laid to rest in the Burkett Cemetery at Coleman County, Texas on January 6, 1919. Survived by his wife and mother.

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DOD 4 Jan 1919


Private Aubrey H. Calahan

Mr. Aubrey Hugh Calahan, a single white male living in Leaday, Coleman County, Texas and working as a farmer for himself at 6 miles north of Leaday as of June 5, 1917. Aubrey was medium height and medium build with black hair and gray eyes, and probably a very tan complexion from all of the farm work. Born in Salado, Bell County, September 6, 1894 to Louis H. and Georgia Ann Calahan, and raised there in Bell County during his childhood. He was reported living with his parents and siblings in Bell County in the 1900 census. He was reported living with his parents and siblings in Coleman County in the 1910 census. Aubrey married Runie Calahan between June 1917 and April 1918. On Aubrey's Army record his wife is listed as next of kin and living in Leaday, Texas.

Aubrey was drafted into federal service for the US Army on April 27, 1918 at Coleman, Texas. He was sent to boot camp at Camp Travis in San Antonio. Aubrey was in Camp Travis for training with the 42nd Company 11th Training Battalion 165th Depot Brigade. Private Calahan was assigned to Company E 360th Infantry Regiment in the 90th Infantry Division. His Company E 360th Infantry Regiment moved out to Camp Mills New York and then to the port of embarkation in Hoboken New Jersey and boarded the transport ship to England on June 14, 1918 for the 11 day voyage to England. But then, only a few days after reaching England Aubrey's company entered France and spent time training near Rouvres France for six weeks at eight hours per day. On August 19, 1918, the division moved to the vicinity of Toul. This move was scarcely completed when the division was ordered to relieve the 1st Division in the line in the Villers-en-Haye sector north of Toul, which was completed on August 24, 1918.

The 90th division's St. Mihiel operation was September 12-16, 1918. The division remained in line in the Puvenelle sector until October 10, 1918. Meuse-Argonne operations October 13 to November 11, 1918. Aubrey was killed in action on the battlefield during the division's Meuse-Argonne operations on November 1, 1918. His wife was notified.

[Army] Private Aubrey H. Calahan was buried in a temporary grave there in France to be later repatriated to America. The Graves Registration Service of the US Army was Aubrey's new unit. The GRS did an awesome job during and after the battles of WW1. Aubrey's remains were loaded onto the USAT Wheaton in Antwerp Belgium on August 6, 1921 and arrived in Hoboken New Jersey on August 20, 1921. Then shipped September 1, 1921 by train to Coleman, Texas arriving September 8, 1921. Aubrey Calahan was laid to rest in the Leaday Cemetery at Voss, Coleman County, Texas. Survived by his wife and parents.

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KIA 1 Nov 1918


Private Frank R. Cole

Mr. Frank Ransom Cole, a single white male living in Glen Cove, Coleman County, Texas and working as a farm and ranch laborer for J. P. McCord near Glen Cove as of June 5, 1917. Frank was tall and medium build with black hair and gray eyes, and probably a very tan complexion from all of the farm work. Born in Ballinger, Runnels County, December 23, 1894 to George D. and Ada B. (Ransom) Cole, and raised there in Runnels County during his childhood. He was reported living with his parents and siblings in Mitchell County in the 1900 census. He was reported living with his parents and siblings in Glen Cove, Coleman County in the 1910 census. Frank's Army record his mother is listed as next of kin and living in Glen Cove, Texas.

Frank was drafted into federal service for the US Army on February 23, 1918 at Coleman, Texas. He was sent to boot camp at Camp Travis in San Antonio. Frank was in Camp Travis for training with the 18th Company 5th Training Battalion 165th Depot Brigade. Private Cole was assigned to Company C 359th Infantry Regiment in the 90th Infantry Division on March 24, 1918. His Company C 359th Infantry Regiment moved out to Camp Mills New York and then to the port of embarkation in Hoboken New Jersey and boarded the transport ship to England on June 20, 1918 for the 11 day voyage to England. But then, only a few days after reaching England Frank's company entered France and spent time training near Rouvres France for six weeks at eight hours per day. Frank was promoted to Private 1st Class on August 7, 1918. On August 19, 1918, the division moved to the vicinity of Toul. This move was scarcely completed when the division was ordered to relieve the 1st Division in the line in the Villers-en-Haye sector north of Toul, which was completed on August 24, 1918.

The 90th division's St. Mihiel operation was September 12-16, 1918. The division remained in line in the Puvenelle sector until October 10, 1918. Meuse-Argonne operations October 13 to November 11, 1918. Frank was killed in action on the battlefield during the division's Meuse-Argonne operations on November 1, 1918. His mother was notified in Brownwood, Texas.

[Army] Private Frank R. Cole was buried in a temporary grave there in France to be later repatriated to America. The Graves Registration Service of the US Army was Frank's new unit. The GRS did an awesome job during and after the battles of WW1. Frank's remains were loaded onto the USAT Wheaton in Antwerp Belgium on September 19, 1921 and arrived in Hoboken New Jersey on October 3, 1921. Then shipped October 7, 1921 by train to Coleman, Texas arriving October 15, 1921. Frank Cole was laid to rest in the Glen Cove Cemetery at Glen Cove, Coleman County, Texas. Survived by his parents.

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KIA 1 Nov 1918


Private Robert S. Crosby

Mr. Robert S. Crosby, a single white male living in Belton, Bell County, Texas and his employment is unknown as of December 12, 1917. Born in Santa Anna, Coleman County, November 12, 1899 to William J. and Annie (Allen) Crosby, and was raised there in Coleman County. Robert and his family are found in the 1900 census as living in Coleman County. His mother died in 1908. Robert was reported in the 1910 census as being in Belton, Bell County, with his father and siblings. Robert's father is listed next of kin on his Army record, and living in Belton, Texas.

Robert was enlisted into federal service for the US Army on December 12, 1917 at Ft Sam Houston, Texas. Recruit Crosby was sent to Camp Joseph E. Johnston in Duval County, Florida and he was assigned to the 11th Receiving Company Quartermaster Corps. Private Robert got sick with the spinal meningitis and died on December 31, 1917 in the base hospital at Camp Joseph E. Johnston in Duval County, Florida. His father was notified in Belton, Texas.

[Army] Private Robert S. Crosby's remains were shipped by train to Belton, Texas arriving January 2, 1918. Robert Crosby was laid to rest in the North Belton Cemetery at Belton, Bell County, Texas 0n January 2, 1918. Survived by his father.

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DOD 31 Dec 1917


Private Joseph B. Duncan

Mr. Joseph Bailey Duncan, a single white male living in Glen Cove, Coleman County, Texas and working as a farmer and rancher for himself near Glen Cove as of June 5, 1917. Joe was tall and stout build with black hair and gray eyes, and probably a very tan complexion from all of the ranch work. Born in Glen Cove, Coleman County, May 16, 1893 to James L. and Clarinda F. (Cave) Duncan, and raised there in Coleman County during his childhood. He was reported living with his parents and siblings in Coleman County in the 1900 census. His father died in 1904. He was reported living with his mother and siblings in Glen Cove, Coleman County in the 1910 census. Joe's Army record listed his mother as next of kin and living in Glen Cove, Texas.

Joe was drafted into federal service for the US Army on February 23, 1918 at Coleman, Texas. He was sent to boot camp at Camp Travis in San Antonio. Joe was in Camp Travis for training with the 18th Company 5th Training Battalion 165th Depot Brigade. Private Duncan was assigned to Company C 359th Infantry Regiment in the 90th Infantry Division on March 24, 1918. His Company C 359th Infantry Regiment moved out to Camp Mills New York and then to the port of embarkation in Hoboken New Jersey and boarded the transport ship to England on June 20, 1918 for the 11 day voyage to England. But then, only a few days after reaching England Joe's company entered France and spent time training near Rouvres France for six weeks at eight hours per day. On August 19, 1918, the division moved to the vicinity of Toul. This move was scarcely completed when the division was ordered to relieve the 1st Division in the line in the Villers-en-Haye sector north of Toul, which was completed on August 24, 1918.

The 90th division's St. Mihiel operation was September 12-16, 1918. The division remained in line in the Puvenelle sector until October 10, 1918. Meuse-Argonne operations October 13 to November 11, 1918. Joe was wounded in action on the battlefield during the division's Meuse-Argonne operations on November 2, 1918 and died of the wounds on December 9, 1918. His mother, Rinda Duncan, was notified in Glen Cove, Texas.

[Army] Private Joe Duncan was buried in a temporary grave there in France to be later repatriated to America. The Graves Registration Service of the US Army was Joe's new unit. The GRS did an awesome job during and after the battles of WW1. Joe's remains were loaded onto the USAT Wheaton in Bordeaux France on January 24, 1921 and arrived in Hoboken New Jersey on February 10, 1921. Then shipped February 18, 1921 by train to Coleman, Texas arriving February 23, 1921. Joseph Duncan was laid to rest in the Glen Cove Cemetery at Glen Cove, Coleman County, Texas. Survived by his mother.

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DOW 9 Dec 1918


Private John W. Fondren

Mr. John W. Fondren, a single white male living in San Angelo, Tom Green County, Texas and likely working as farm laborer for his brother as of May 18, 1917. John was born in Coleman County, May 18, 1897 to Richard S. and Ella F. Fondren, and raised there in Coleman County. John is reported as living with his parents and siblings in Coleman County, Texas in both the 1900 and 1910 censuses. His father is listed on his Army record as next of kin living in Coleman, Texas

John enlisted into federal service for the US Army on May 18, 1917 at Ft Bliss, Texas. Recruit Fondren was trained up at Ft Bliss in El Paso, and then he was assigned to Company F 16th Infantry Regiment. Soon after America entered the World War on April 6, 1917, his unit was assigned to the 1st Infantry Division. Private Fondren was assigned to Company F 16th Infantry Regiment and they moved out to the port of embarkation in New Jersey and boarded the transport ship to France on June 14, 1917 for the 11 day voyage to France.

The First Division being the first American division to enter France, and first to fire a shot at the Germans, for training they were initially under the tactical command of the French Army. Private Fondren fought in the Luneville sector October 21, 1917 to November 20, 1917, the Ansauville sector January 15, 1918 to April 3, 1918. Then, only a few days of quiet before the division entered the Cantigny sector on April 25, 1918. The Cantigny operation was carried out the morning of May 28th, the division advancing the line three to six hundred yards on a twenty-two-hundred yard front. Division was relieved July 7, 1918. Entered the line the night of July 17, 1918, for the Soissons operation, approximately fifteen kilometers southwest of Soissons. The fighting was severe throughout the attack, especially July 20th and 21st. During this battle Private Fondren was wounded in action on July 21, 1918 and died of the wounds on July 22, 1918. His father, Richard Fondren was notified in Coleman, Texas.

[Army] Private John W. Fondren was buried in a temporary grave there in France to be later repatriated to Texas. The Graves Registration Service of the US Army was John's new unit. The GRS did an awesome job during and after the battles of WW1. John's remains were loaded onto the USAT Wheaton in Antwerp Belgium on June 19, 1921 and arrived in Hoboken New Jersey on July 2, 1921. Then shipped July 29, 1921 by train to San Angelo, Texas arriving August 3, 1921. John Fondren was laid to rest in the Fairmount Cemetery at San Angelo, Tom Green County, Texas. Survived by his parents.

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DOW 22 Jul 1918


Private Will C. Freeman

Mr. Will Claiborn Freeman, a single white male living in Coleman, Coleman County, Texas and he was working as a farm laborer for John Pearce as of June 5, 1917. Will was a tall stout build man with red hair and brown eyes and a tan complexion from the farm work. Born at Newton County, Georgia on January 18, 1891 to Milton C. and Nancy Loula Freeman, and was raised there in Newton County. Will and his family are reported in the 1900 census as being in Navarro County, Texas. Will's father died in 1907. Will and his mother and siblings are not found on the 1910 census, but his step-father is found in Coleman County living with his daughter and son-in-law being widowed. Apparently his mother and John Foreman married sometime between 1910 and 1917. His step-father, John W. Foreman, is listed as next of kin on Will's Army record, and living in Coleman, Texas.

Will was drafted into federal service for the US Army on July 22, 1918 at Coleman, Texas. Recruit Freeman was sent to Camp John Wise, north of San Antonio, Texas, he was assigned to 39th Balloon Company in the Air Section of the Signal Corps. He was assigned to the 92nd Balloon Company at Fort Omaha, Nebraska on September 21, 1918. Will was assigned to the 28th Balloon Company at Camp East in Washington D.C. on December 23, 1918. Will was taken ill with influenza and died of pneumonia in the post hospital at Camp East on March 5, 1919. His step-father was notified in Coleman, Texas.

[Army] Private Will C. Freeman's body was loaded on a railway car and sent by train to Waxahachie, Texas arriving March 9, 1919 and his funeral to be afternoon the same day. Will Freeman was laid to rest in the Waxahachie Cemetery at Waxahachie, Ellis County, Texas. Survived by his mother and step-father.

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DOD 5 Mch 1919


Private Frank Grounds

Mr. Frank Grounds a single white male living in Whitesboro, Texas and being an unemployed farmer as of June 5, 1917 when he registered for the draft in Grayson County. Born September 12, 1895 in Blue Ridge, Collin County, Texas to Daniel W. and Sarah M. Grounds, and raised in Texas. In the 1900 census at age 5 he was living with his parents and siblings in JP8 Collin County, Texas. The 1910 census at age 14 has him living with his parents and siblings in Ethel, Grayson County, Texas. Frank's Army record lists his father, Mr. Daniel Grounds, as next of kin and living in Abilene, Texas.

Frank was drafted into federal service for the US Army on July 22, 1918 at Denison, Texas. Recruit Grounds was sent to boot camp at Camp Travis in San Antonio on July 22, 1918. Private Grounds was in Camp Travis for training with the 40th Company 10th Battalion 165th Depot Brigade. On September 4, 1918 he was transferred to Camp Merritt, New Jersey with the Ambulance Company 121 of the 106th Sanitary Train. Frank got sick, probably the influenza, was on this assignment less than 2 months when he died of pneumonia on October 29, 1918 in the Camp Merritt post hospital. His father was notified in Glen Cove, Texas.

[Army] Private Frank Grounds' body was sent by train to Coleman, Coleman County, Texas and was laid to rest in the Glen Cove Cemetery at Glen Cove, Coleman County, Texas on about November 3, 1918. Survived by his mother and father.

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DOD 29 Oct 1918


Private Carr E. Hector

Mr. Carr E. Hector, a single white male living in Coleman, Coleman County, Texas and he was working as a farmer for himself as of June 5, 1917. Carr was a medium height slender build man with black hair and brown eyes and a tan complexion from the farm work. Born at San Marcos, Hays County, Texas on August 24, 1890 to David A. and Sallie A. Hector, and was raised there in Hays County. His father died in 1899. Carr and his mother and his siblings are reported in the 1900 census as being in Hays County, Texas. Carr and his mother and his siblings are found on the 1910 census at Glen Cove, Coleman County, Texas. His mother is listed as next of kin on Carr's Army record, and living in Glen Cove, Texas.

Carr was drafted into federal service for the US Army on October 7, 1917 at Coleman, Texas. Recruit Hector was sent to Camp Travis, in San Antonio, Texas, he was assigned to 49th Company 13th Training Battalion 165th Depot Brigade. Private Hector was made bugler on January 20, 1918. He was assigned to the Company M 59th Infantry Regiment 4th Division at Camp Greene, Charlotte, North Carolina on March 14, 1918. The 4th Division began leaving Camp Greene April 18, 1918, by way of Camp Merritt and Camp Mills. His Regiment moved out to Camp Mills New York and then to the port of embarkation in Hoboken New Jersey and boarded the transport ship to France on May 5, 1918 for the 11 day voyage to France.

By June 3, 1918 all organizations, except artillery, were in the Samer area for training with the British. The artillery trained at Camp de Souge. On June 9, 1918, the 4th Division moved to the Meaux and vicinity and on June 15th moved to LaFerte, being at the disposal of the 164th French Infantry Division. Units of the division participated in the fighting around Haute-Vesnes, Courchamps, Chevillon, St. Gengoulph and Sommelans until July 22d, when the division was made reserve. Private Hector was killed in action on July 19, 1918 during the St. Gengoulph, Aisne operation. His mother was notified of his death.

[Army] Private Carr E. Hector was buried in a temporary grave there in France to be later repatriated to America. The Graves Registration Service of the US Army was Carr's new unit. The GRS did an awesome job during and after the battles of WW1. Carr's remains were loaded onto the USAT Wheaton in Antwerp Belgium on August 6, 1921 and arrived in Hoboken New Jersey on August 20, 1921. Then shipped September 2, 1921 by train to Coleman, Texas arriving September 8, 1921. Carr Hector was laid to rest in the Glen Cove Cemetery at Glen Cove, Coleman County, Texas. Survived by his mother.

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KIA 19 Jul 1918


Private Jesse G. Heilman

Mr. Jesse Gusdave Heilman, a single white male living in Rockwood, Coleman County, Texas and working as a farmer for himself as of June 5, 1917. Jesse was a medium height medium built man with brown hair and gray eyes, and probably a very tan complexion from all of the outside work. Born in Martin Station, Vanderburgh County, Indiana October 3, 1891 to August L. and Frances B. Heilman, and raised there in Vanderburgh County. He is reported as living with his parents and siblings in Armstrong, Vanderburgh County, Indiana on the 1900 census. Jesse moved to the Rockwood, Texas area sometime during 1915 with his parents and siblings. Jesse's father, Gus L. Heilman, is listed as next of kin on his Army record.

Jesse was drafted into federal service for the US Army on July 22, 1918 at Coleman, Texas. Recruit Heilman was sent to boot camp at Camp Travis in San Antonio assigned to 42nd Company 11th Training Battalion 165th Depot Brigade. August 20, 1918 Private Heilman was sent to Camp Wheeler in Georgia for training with the Corps of Engineers and on September 2, 1918 he was assigned to Company B 106th Engineers Regiment in the 31st Infantry Division. Soon after his assignment they moved out to the port of embarkation in Hoboken, New Jersey and boarded the transport ship to Great Britain on September 16, 1918 for the 11 day voyage to Scotland. But then, only a few days after reaching Scotland, Jesse got sick with the enfluenza and died of pneumonia on October 1, 1918. His father was notified.

[Army] Private Jesse G. Heilman was buried in a temporary grave there in Scotland to be later repatriated to America. The Graves Registration Service of the US Army was Jesse's new unit. The GRS did an awesome job during and after the battles of WW1. Jesse's remains were loaded onto the USAT Northern Pacific in Liverpool England on October 19, 1920 and arrived in Hoboken New Jersey on October 28, 1920. Then November 16, 1920 by train to Arlington, Virginia arriving on November 17, 1920. Jesse Heilman was laid to rest in the Arlington National Cemetery at Arlington County, Virginia on November 19, 1920. Survived by his parents.

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DOD 1 Oct 1918


Private Ed W. Hunter

Mr. Ed Wood Hunter, a single white male living in Whon, Coleman County, Texas and he was a farm laborer for his father at Whon, Texas as of September 12, 1918. Ed was a medium height medium built man with black hair and brown eyes, and probably a tan complexion from all of the farm work. Born in Trickham, Coleman County, December 19, 1898 to George F. and Belle Z. Hunter, and raised there in the area of Trickham. Ed was reported living with his parents in Coleman County in 1900 census and was not found in the 1910 census. He had moved to an apartment in Brownwood, Texas to attend Howard Payne College. Ed's father is listed as next of kin on his Army record.

Ed was drafted into federal service for the US Army on October 1, 1918 at Brownwood, Texas. Private Hunter was assigned to the Students Army Training Corps at Howard Payne College, Brownwood, Texas. Ed was in the SATC less than three weeks when he got sick with a respiratory disease and died of pneumonia on October 20, 1918. His father was notified.

[Army] Private Ed W. Hunter was laid to rest in the Whon Cemetery at Coleman County, Texas on October 21, 1918. Survived by his parents.

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DOD 20 Oct 1918


Private Milton E. Hurt

Mr. Milton E. Hurt, a single white male living in Silver Valley, Coleman County, Texas and he was farming for himself as of June 5, 1917. Milton was of medium height and medium build with light colored hair and blue eyes and a tan complexion. Born in McLennan County, Texas July 9, 1886 to Benjamin F. and Candace A. (Burk) Hurt, and was raised there in McLennan County. Milton and his parents and siblings are found in the 1900 census as living in Coleman County. His father died in 1903. Milton was reported in the 1910 census as being in Coleman County, with his mother and one sibling. Milton's mother is listed as next of kin on his Army record, and living in Mesquite, Texas.

Milton was drafted into federal service for the US Army on August 6, 1918 at Coleman, Texas. Recruit Hurt was sent to Camp Cody in New Mexico and he was assigned to the Company H 133d Infantry Regiment 34th Division. The 34th Division remained in training at Camp Cody, New Mexico, until, September 1918. The first units sailed for overseas on September 16, 1918, via England. Private Milton got sick with the enfluenza and died of pneumonia on September 23, 1918 in the base hospital at Camp Dix in Burlington County, New Jersey awaiting embarkation. His mother was notified in Mesquite, Texas.

[Army] Private Milton E. Hurt's remains were shipped by train to Coleman, Texas arriving October 1918. Milton Hurt was laid to rest in the Mountain View Cemetery at Coleman, Coleman County, Texas. Survived by his mother.

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DOD 23 Sep 1918


Private James R. Laughlin

Mr. James Raymond Laughlin, a single white male living in Trickham, Coleman County, Texas and working as a farmer for himself as of June 5, 1917. James was short and stout with black hair and blue eyes and a tan complexion. Born in Laneport, Williamson County, Texas on July 28, 1892 to James S. and Ollie Laughlin, and raised there in Williamson County, Texas. James is not found on the 1900 census. James is reported living with his parents and siblings in Coleman County on the 1910 census. His father is listed as next of kin on his Army record living in Trickham, Texas.

James was drafted into federal service for the US Army on July 5, 1918 at Coleman, Texas. Recruit Laughlin was sent to Camp MacArthur, in Waco, Texas. James was in Camp MacArthur with the Infantry Replacement and Training Camp assigned to Company K 12th Battalion 4th Regiment 57th Depot Brigade. On August 15, 1918 he was assigned to 6th Company August Auto Replacement Draft of Camp MacArthur. James's unit moved out to the port of embarkation in Hoboken New Jersey and boarded the transport ship on August 24, 1918 for the eleven day voyage to France. But then, only a few days after reaching France James's company spent time training near Luneville France. On September 11, 1918, James was assigned to Company C 60th Infantry Regiment 5th Division in time for the Saint Mihiel operation September 12-16, 1918. On September 17-27, 1918, the division moved to the vicinity of Toul, then September 28, 1918 the 5th Division moved to Pagny-sur-Meuse for training and equipping. The division's Meuse-Argonne operation was October 5 to November 11, 1918. Private Laughlin was killed in action on October 14, 1918. His father was notified.

[Army] Private James R. Laughlin was buried in a temporary grave there in France to be later repatriated to America. The Graves Registration Service of the US Army was James's new unit. The GRS did an awesome job during and after the battles of WW1. James's remains were loaded onto the USAT Cantigny in Antwerp Belgium on September 1, 1921 and arrived in Hoboken New Jersey on September 12, 1921. Then shipped October 3, 1921 by train to San Antonio, Texas arriving October 14, 1921. James Hector was laid to rest in the San Antonio National Cemetery at Bexar County, Texas. Survived by his parents.

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KIA 14 Oct 1918


Private Edgar Leflar

Mr. Edgar Leflar, a single white male living in Coleman, Texas and working a farm for himself in Coleman County as of June 5, 1917. Edgar was a tall and slender man with light color hair and blue eyes, and probably a very tan complexion from all of the farm work. Born in Johnson County, Texas October 27, 1893 to (father's given name unknown) Leflar and Lucy S. 'Lona' (Clark) Leflar, and he was raised there in Johnson County. I assume his father died before 1900. He was reported living with his grandparents, mother and other family in Holland, Bell County in the 1900 census. In the 1910 census, he is reported as living with his step-father Benjamin H. Wheeler, his mother and siblings in Coleman County. Edgar's Army record lists his mother, Mrs. Benjamin Hamp Wheeler, as next of kin and living in Coleman, Texas.

Edgar was drafted into federal service for the US Army on September 19, 1917 at Coleman, Texas. Recruit Leflar was sent to boot camp at Camp Travis in San Antonio on September 20, 1917. Private Leflar was in Camp Travis for training with the Battery C 345th Field Artillery Regiment 90th Division. Edgar got sick, probably the influenza, was on this assignment only 5 months when he died of pneumonia on February 12, 1918 in the Camp Travis post hospital. His mother was notified.

[Army] Private Edgar Leflar's body was sent by train to Coleman, Texas and was laid to rest in the White Chapel Cemetery at Coleman County, Texas on February 13, 1918. Survived by his mother and step-father.

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DOD 12 Feb 1918


Seaman 2nd Class Petty Officer Coleman S. Love

Mr. Coleman Stevens Love, a single white male living in Coleman County, Texas and he was farming for his father as of September 5, 1917. Born March 21, 1897 in Coleman County, Texas to Lucien Clay and Nellie Gray (Kegans) Love and raised there in Coleman County. In the 1900 census at age 3 he was living with his parents and siblings in JP1 Coleman County, Texas. Coleman's mother is listed as next of kin on his Navy record, living in Coleman, Texas.

Coleman went to the Navy Recruiting Station at Dallas, Texas and enlisted into the US Navy as an Apprentice Seaman on 18 September 1917. Coleman was sent to the Naval Training Station in Great Lakes, Illinois. On January 4, 1918 he went to the Training Camp at Charleston, South Carolina. On February 25, 1918 he was sent to the Naval Operating Base in Norfolk, Virginia, and promoted to Seaman 2nd Class Petty Officer. On March 8, 1918 Coleman was assigned to the USS Georgia, and then on June 2, 1918 assigned to the USS Virginia. On June 21, 1918 he was transferred to the Receiving Ship Norfolk until September 7, 1918 when he went on board the USS Lake Huron. S2c Coleman died of pneumonia on October 9, 1918 while at sea aboard the USS Lake Huron.

[Navy] Seaman 2nd Class Petty Officer Coleman S. Love was buried at sea in the North Atlantic Ocean. He is remembered on the Tablets of the Missing and Buried at Sea in the Suresnes American Cemetery and Memorial at Suresnes, Departement des Hauts-de-Seine, Île-de-France, France.

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DOD 9 Oct 1918


Sergeant David L. Petty

Mr. David Leroy Petty, a married white male living near Novice, Coleman County, but in Runnels County, Texas and working as a minister for himself as of June 5, 1917. David was medium height and medium build with brown hair and blue eyes, and probably a very tan complexion from all of the farm work. Born in Sparta, Bell County, November 30, 1888 to Samuel P. and Texana (Clements) Petty, and raised there in Bell County during his childhood. He was reported living with his parents and siblings in Brown County in the 1900 census. David was reported living with his parents and siblings in Menard County in the 1910 census. On his draft registration he reported he was married, but no records found of it. David moved to the Novice area sometime between 1910 and 1917. On David's Army record his mother is listed as next of kin and living in Novice, Texas.

David was drafted into federal service for the US Army on September 20, 1917 at Ballinger, Texas. He was sent to boot camp at Camp Travis in San Antonio. David was in Camp Travis for training with the 58th Company 15th Training Battalion 165th Depot Brigade. On October 12, 1917 Private Petty was assigned to Medical Department Field Hospital 360 in the 90th Infantry Division. David was promoted to Private 1st Class on November 20, 1917. David remained at Camp Travis and was promoted to Sergeant on June 1, 1918. His Field Hospital 360 moved out to Camp Mills New York and then to the port of embarkation in Hoboken New Jersey and boarded the transport ship to England on June 28, 1918 for the 11 day voyage to England. But then, only a few days after reaching England David's unit entered France and spent time training near Rouvres France for six weeks at eight hours per day. On August 19, 1918, the division moved to the vicinity of Toul. This move was scarcely completed when the division was ordered to relieve the 1st Division in the line in the Villers-en-Haye sector north of Toul, which was completed on August 24, 1918.

The 90th division's St. Mihiel operation was September 12-16, 1918. The division remained in line in the Puvenelle sector until October 10, 1918. Meuse-Argonne operations October 13 to November 11, 1918. David was wounded in action on the battlefield during the division's Meuse-Argonne operations. Sergeant Petty died of wounds on November 9, 1918. His mother was notified.

[Army] Sergeant David L. Petty was buried in a temporary grave there in France to be later repatriated to America. The Graves Registration Service of the US Army was David's new unit. The GRS did an awesome job during and after the battles of WW1. David's remains were loaded onto the USAT Wheaton in Antwerp Belgium on June 19, 1921 and arrived in Hoboken New Jersey on July 2, 1921. Then shipped July 29, 1921 by train to Brownwood, Texas arriving August 3, 1921. David Petty was laid to rest in the Roberts Cemetery, Lake Brownwood, Brown County, Texas. Survived by his parents, however, his mother died May 28, 1919.

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DOW 9 Nov 1918


Private Otto Ray

Mr. Otto Ray, a single white male living in Coleman, Coleman County, Texas and working as a tailor for Mr. E. W. Whitaker in Coleman, Texas as of June 5, 1917. Otto was tall and slender with dark color hair and gray eyes, and probably a tan complexion. Born in Holland, Bell County, Texas on February 18, 1893 to Franklin A. and Mollie C. Ray and he was raised in Bell County. He was reported living with his parents and siblings in Bartlett, Bell County, Texas in the 1900 census. He was reported living with his parents and siblings in Coleman, Coleman County, Texas in the 1910 census. Otto's father is listed as next of kin on his Army record living in Coleman, Texas.

Otto was drafted into federal service for the US Army on September 19, 1917 at Coleman, Texas. Recruit Ray was sent to Camp Travis. Private Ray was assigned Detachment 2 165th Depot Brigade Camp Travis Texas. His detachment moved out to the port of embarkation in Hoboken New Jersey and boarded the transport SS Tuscania to England on January 24, 1918 for the 11 day voyage to England. Two hundred fifty two soldiers from Texas were aboard the troop carrier SS Tuscania bound for England. She was torpedoed by a German U-boat February 5, 1918 near the isle of Islay, U.K. Of the 252 from Texas, 204 of them survived the ordeal, but 48 young men did not. Otto did not, killed in action February 5, 1918. His father was notified in Coleman, Texas.

[Army] Private Otto Ray was buried in a temporary grave there in Scotland to be later repatriated to America. The Graves Registration Service of the US Army was Otto's new unit. The GRS did an awesome job during and after the battles of WW1. Otto's remains were loaded onto the USAT Antigone in Liverpool, England and departed on September 18, 1920 and arrived in Hoboken New Jersey on September 29, 1920. Then shipped by train on October 15, 1920 to Coleman, Texas, arriving October 20, 1920. Otto Ray was laid to rest in the Coleman City Cemetery at Coleman County, Texas under the auspices of the Ray Post of the American Legion, assisted by Rev. G. N. Morrison of Haskell, Texas. Survived by his parents.

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KIA 5 Feb 1918


Private Orien B. Rose

Mr. Orien Bain Rose a single white male living in Houston, Texas and being unemployed as of June 5, 1918 when he registered for the draft. Born May 16, 1897 in Gatesville, Coryell County, Texas to John and Fannie Rose, and raised in Texas. In the 1900 census at age 3 he was living with his parents and siblings in Gatesville, Coryell County, Texas. The 1910 census at age 12 has him living with his parents and siblings in JP1 McCulloch County, Texas. Orien's Army record lists his father, Mr. John Rose, as next of kin and living in Coleman, Texas.

Orien was drafted into federal service for the US Army on August 29, 1918 at Houston, Texas. Recruit Rose was sent to boot camp at Camp Travis in San Antonio on August 30, 1918. Private Rose was in Camp Travis for training with the 47th Company 12th Battalion 165th Depot Brigade. Orien got sick, probably the influenza, was on this assignment less than 2 months when he died of pneumonia on October 17, 1918 in the Camp Travis post hospital. His father was notified.

[Army] Private Orien B. Rose's body was sent by train to Santa Anna, Coleman County, Texas and was laid to rest in the Santa Anna Cemetery at Santa Anna, Coleman County, Texas on October 18, 1918. Survived by his mother and father.

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DOD 17 Oct 1918


Private John D. Sawyer

Mr. John David Sawyer, a single white male living in San Angelo, Tom Green County, Texas and working as an auto driver for Mr. John O'Neil as of June 5, 1917. John was a medium height medium build man with brown hair and brown eyes, and probably a normal complexion. Born at Coleman, Coleman County, April 23, 1896 to Macklin and Abbie Lee (Augustine) Sawyer, and was raised there in Coleman County. John 'Dave J.' and his parents and his siblings are reported in the 1900 census as being in Crockett County, Texas. His father has died or left the family between 1900 and 1910. John 'David' and his mother and brother are living with his grandparents, David Augustine and wife Mary, as reported in the 1910 census and being in San Angelo, Tom Green County. John married Miss Lexa Mae Walton in San Angelo, Texas on June 18, 1918. John's wife, Lexa M. Sawyer, is listed next of kin on his Army record living in San Angelo, Texas.

John was drafted into federal service for the US Army on June 25, 1918 at San Angelo, Texas. Recruit Sawyer was sent to boot camp at Camp Travis in San Antonio and assigned to 49th Company 7th Training Battalion 165th Depot Brigade. On September 17, 1918 Private Sawyer was assigned to 34th Company Camp MacArthur September Auto Replacement Draft and they moved out to the port of embarkation in New Jersey and boarded the transport ship to France on September 29, 1918 for the 11 day voyage to France. John got sick aboard the transport ship with the influenza and died of pneumonia on October 6, 1918 at sea enroute to France. His wife was notified in San Angelo, Texas.

[Army] Private John D. Sawyer was buried in a temporary grave there in France to be later repatriated to America. The Graves Registration Service of the US Army was John's new unit. The GRS did an awesome job during and after the battles of WW1. John's remains were loaded onto the USAT Mercury in Brest France on June 6, 1920 and arrived in Hoboken New Jersey on June 30, 1920. Then shipped July 14, 1920 by train to Little Rock, Arkansas arriving July 17, 1920, forwarded to San Angelo, Texas arriving on July 19, 1920. John Sawyer was laid to rest in the Fairmount Cemetery at San Angelo, Tom Green County, Texas. Survived by his wife and mother.

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DOD 6 Oct 1918


Private Earl A. Scott

Mr. Earl Augustus Scott, a single white male living in Goldsboro, Coleman County, Texas and working as a farmer for himself as of June 5, 1917. Earl was a tall stout built man with light brown hair and gray eyes, and probably a tan complexion from all the farm work. Born at San Marcos, Hays County, December 1, 1892 to Agustus and Cornelia (Hacker) Scott, and was raised there in Hays County. Earl 'Early' and his parents and his siblings are reported in the 1900 census as being in Caldwell County, Texas. Earl and his parents and siblings are living, as reported in the 1910 census, in Runnels County, Texas. Earl's father, Gus Scott, is listed next of kin on his Army record living in Holtville, California.

Earl was drafted into federal service for the US Army on July 22, 1918 at Coleman, Texas. Recruit Scott was sent to boot camp at Camp Travis in San Antonio and assigned to 42nd Company 5th Training Battalion 165th Depot Brigade. In August or September 1918 Private Scott was assigned to Battery D 127th Field Artillery 34th Division Camp Cody, New Mexico. They moved out to the port of embarkation in New Jersey and boarded the transport ship SS City of York to France on September 25, 1918 for the 11 day voyage to France. Earl got sick aboard the transport ship with the influenza and died of pneumonia on October 6, 1918 at sea and buried at sea. His father was notified.

[Army] Private Earl A. Scott was buried at sea and his name is remembered on the Tablets of the Missing and Buried at Sea in the Suresnes↙ American Cametery and Memorial at Suresnes, France. Survived by his parents.

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DOD 6 Oct 1918


Private Henry F. Thornton

Mr. Henry Fletcher Thornton, a single white male living in Boyd, Wise County, Texas and working as a farm laborer for Mr. Dan K. Richardson as of July 3, 1918. Henry was not required to register for the draft due to his young age. Born in Santa Anna, Coleman County, February 1900 to Henry J. and Nancy Lee Thornton, and raised there in Coleman County during his childhood. He was living with his parents in Coleman County as reported in the 1900 census. He was living with his half-brother, Dan K. Richardson and wife, and his siblings in Coleman County as reported in the 1910 census. Henry moved to the Boyd, Texas area to live with his half-brother sometime about 1912, because his parents both died in 1912. On Henry's Army record his half-brother, Dan Richardson, is listed as next of kin and living in Boyd, Texas.

Henry was enlisted into federal service for the US Army on July 3, 1918 at Boyd, Texas. He was sent to Pensacola, Florida assigned to the 3rd Company Coast Artillery Corps of Pensacola. August 26, 1918 Henry was unassigned in the Coast Artillery Corps. On September 6, 1918 Private Thornton was assigned to Battery A 46th Artillery Regiment in the Coast Artillery Corps. Soon after his assignment they moved out to Camp Mills New York and then to the port of embarkation in Hoboken New Jersey and boarded the transport ship to France on October 14, 1918 for the 11 day voyage to France. But then, only a couple days after reaching France, Henry died of pneumonia on October 28, 1918. His half-brother was notified.

[Army] Private Henry F. Thornton was buried in a temporary grave there in France to be later repatriated to Texas. The Graves Registration Service of the US Army was Henry's new unit. The GRS did an awesome job during and after the battles of WW1. Henry's remains were loaded onto the USAT Mercury in Brest France on June 6, 1920 and arrived in Hoboken New Jersey on June 30, 1920. Then shipped July 27, 1920 by train to Boyd, Texas arriving on July 31, 1920. Henry Thornton was laid to rest in Boyd Cemetery(unconfirmed) at Wise County, Texas. Survived by his half-brother, Dan K. Richardson.

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DOD 28 Oct 1918


Private Robert Walden

Mr. Robert Walden, a single white male living in Voss, Coleman County, Texas and working as a farmer for himself as of June 5, 1917. Robert was of tall and slender with dark color hair and blue eyes, and probably a very tan complexion from all of the farm work. Born in Lee County on (don't know date) 1894 to J. J. and (mother unknown) Walden, and he was raised there in Lee County. He was not found in either the 1900 or 1910 census. It is also unknown when Robert moved to the Voss area. Robert's father is listed as the next of kin on his Army record.

Robert was drafted into federal service for the US Army on September 19, 1917 at Coleman, Texas. Recruit Walden was sent to boot camp at Camp Travis in San Antonio on September 20, 1917. Private Walden was in Camp Travis for training with the Company C 15th Training Battalion 165th Depot Brigade. He was there about three months then sent to Camp Bowie in Fort Worth and was assigned to the Headquarters Company 143rd Infantry Regiment of the 36th Infantry Division. Robert was there only a few days when he got sick, probably the influenza, and died of pneumonia on December 12, 1917. His father was notified in Voss, Texas.

[Army] Private Robert Walden was laid to rest in the Voss Cemetery at Voss, Coleman County, Texas.

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DOD 12 Dec 1917